The right care in the right place: To measure is to know!

Correct care in the right place (JZOJP) is the latest buzzword of administrators and policy makers. NNot surprisingly, because it sounds like a logical and therefore attractive solution to all complex problems in healthcare. The growing group of frail elderly people with dementia, who are living at home for ever longer? No problem, JZOJP will solve this. But those who look beyond the horizon know that it is not that simple. In fact, what if JZOJP is part of the problem? In this blog, we explain the problem with the current JZOJP approach and what it will take to break it.

it sounds like a logical and therefore attractive solution to all the complex problems in health care. The growing group of frail elderly people with dementia, who are living at home for ever longer? No problem, JZOJP will solve this. But those who look beyond the horizon know that it is not that simple. In fact, what if JZOJP is part of the problem? In this blog, we explain the problem with the current JZOJP approach and what it will take to break it.

Bullshit bingo

The Right Care in the Right Place (JZOJP) sounds promising, but turns out not to be easy to apply in practice. The first results of research by the NZA show that approximately 70% of the initiatives fail. The underlying cause of this problem is the so-called Bullshit Bingo that has the Dutch healthcare system in its grip. Just cross it off on the map: Right Care in the Right Place, Care Network, sensible care, care paths, 1.5-line care, substitution, positive health, network medicine, lifestyle medicine, etc. These are all wonderful, simple terms that obscure or ignore the complex connections in the care of the growing group of people with complex problems such as dementia. As a result, none of them provide a concrete solution. The fact that everyone has different definitions of and images of the JZOP concept does not help. At its core, of course, it’s about collaboration and people being able to do that in their own teams and outside their organization, in a context of innovation and trust. It is unclear how well we are really doing.

Knowing is measuring

Therefore, DementieNet and the Essenburgh have started a scientific study into the JZOJP for frail elderly and people with dementia. This cooperation is often far from optimal in the Netherlands. Nevertheless, there are good international examples that showNetwork care scan Essenburgh that improving cooperation has many positive effects: vulnerable older people and their informal carers experience better quality of care, it is more pleasant to work for the care providers and ultimately it is cost-efficient. The research of DementieNetaims to identify the building blocks for successful collaboration in the complex care of people with dementia based on the Rainbow Model. To prove this, 50 local networks are examined and compared with international best practices. The results of the research help to determine concrete input for improvement targets for a successful JZOJP approach in the Netherlands.

Are you with me?

Would you like to know how your care network is doing? Then take part in the DementieNet survey. When you participate in the survey, you get direct insight into the performance of your network and tips on how to optimize collaboration. We ask of your network:

  • Participation in an online audit care network, possibly supplemented by qualitative interviews.

Your network gets from us:

  • Report with the results and comparison with benchmark data.
  • Action plan and tips to improve cooperation step by step.

Want to know more about the research? Click on the link below.

Pim Valentijn

Do you have any questions?
Please contact us.

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